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SoMo Review

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This page was last updated on 21 December, 2020

One of 4thWay's specialists has recently updated the SoMo Review, summarising the key points. (If you've come here for the BridgeCrowd Review, BridgeCrowd has now become SoMo.)

It will probably take 9-10 minutes to read the main section. If you want to read the extra detail we go into on some topics underneath, it'll take about 15-20 minutes.

SoMo Review: the SoMo logo4thWay's Quick Expert SoMo Review

High interest rates and great reviews from lenders, but lets itself down on transparency.

What does SoMo do?

SoMo, formerly BridgeCrowd, does bridging loans and redevelopment loans of £500,000 or more, with a planned term of up to one year.

When did SoMo start?

SoMo started doing P2P loans in 2015, although non-P2P lending started in 2010. Total lending is now £140 million (incuding loans prior to P2P launch).

What interesting or unique points does SoMo have?

SoMo gets some of the most consistently positive reviews from lenders. Lenders seem to have had low double-digit annualised returns on average and relatively few outstanding bad debts on loans made between at least 2010 and 2017/2018, which is highly impressive. However, recent data and clear information is surprisingly patchy.

SoMo does a lot of senior lending, but it has done even more junior lending.

Before you read on, note that there's a high minimum lending amount of £5,000 per loan.

SoMo review: how good are its loans?

The maximum SoMo will lend on most types of loans can get as high as 75%, which is on the slightly high side for these kinds of loans. It's also higher than it used to be, having ticked up twice over the past four years from 65% to 70%, and now 75%.

However, the average loan size compared to the property valuation is 56% ,which is where it was in 2016. This is somewhat on the lower (i.e. better) side, suggesting the loans are low risk overall relative to competitors offering the same kinds of loans to the same quality of borrower.

For over half of loans, you're not first in the queue to get your money back in the event the borrower struggles and the property needs to be sold to repay loans. The inherent risks of such loans are substantially higher.

Since it's a temporary bridging loan, the borrower could well be over-stretched, currently borrowing more than would normally be acceptable based on their current income. The borrower's ability to exit the loan at the end through a sale or other means is critical, although SoMo has this strongly in hand with its loans.

SoMo's heavy focus is on quality of the property security rather than quality of the borrower, which means risk of a debt turning bad and needing lengthy recovery procedures is relatively high.

In the case of redevelopment loans, I'm pleased to see that SoMo bases its decisions on the current property valuation, not the hoped-for future value after works are completed. That is appropriate when the loan is based almost entirely on security quality.

For the kind of lending SoMo does, and it's quality, and factoring in the strict, short terms of these loans, I expect that around a quarter of SoMo's loans will be substantially late or have turned bad at any given point in time. And this certainly was the case a few years ago when we last had sufficient information. More recent, but limited, data we managed to obtain from a third party in 2020 appears to indicate that perhaps around a quarter of SoMo's outstanding loans might be at least six months beyond their initial term and in lots cases far more than that, which matches expectations.

SoMo during COVID-19

SoMo hasn't responded to our requests for information and data on its performance during the pandemic.

How much experience do SoMo's key people have?

SoMo has proven itself over many years and this family business has all of the relevant skills and experience we'd expect to see in property lending and bad-debt recovery, and it also has complementary skills, such as relevant legal backgrounds. The latter is nice to have, since legal matters are usually outsourced.

SoMo has no specialists for quantitative risk modelling, but such modelling is unusual in this kind of lending and so it's another nice to have. SoMo states that its team has processed thousands of loans over many years and never lost money. Although we haven't been able to verify this, we don't doubt it based on its past results.

SoMo review: lending processes

SoMo has talked us through its lending processes, which are high quality, professional and appropriate for these kinds of loans. Its processes centre around looking for a margin of safety in worst-case scenarios and – very important for this kind of lending – a strong and realistic exit strategy for repaying the loan.

Fraud can be a problem in property lending, but clearly SoMo has this very firmly in hand with its processes.

It's clear from SoMo's lending processes that it's familiar with all of the possible risks that can occur in this kind of lending, even long-shot risks, and has these in mind when reviewing borrowers.

Feedback over many years from people who lend through SoMo has consistently indicated it tackles bad debts swiftly (and indeed aggressively). Rapid action is an absolute necessity for these kinds of loans. Otherwise, the risk of losses rises considerably.

How good are SoMo's interest rates, bad debts and margin of safety?

While SoMo states no lenders have lost money – which is a fantastic record – it's necessary with these kinds of loans to understand: what's happening to the outstanding ones that are currently bad debts and in the process of recovery? And how many are bad and how long they have been bad for? Why loans have loans been extended? How many have been extended and for how long?

Without this fuller understanding of the current status as well as the history, it's not clear whether losses in more recent years are being hidden by kicking them further into the future. That behaviour can go on for years before being recognised if a P2P lending company chooses not to provide sufficient information, so we can't see the whole picture here.

We're unable to conduct our stress tests on SoMo to calculate what might happen to lenders if there's a severe recession and property crash.

Nevertheless, based on SoMo's excellent record from its earlier years and assuming this has continued, its interest rates are very attractive indeed. The high interest rates of about 10.56% before bad debts recently, and lending rates typically of 12% after bad debts in its earlier years, appear to be more than adequate compensation, provided lenders don't concentrate a lot of their money into any single loan.

Has SoMo provided enough information to assess the risks?

SoMo doesn't provide data to 4thWay and only sporadically responds to 4thWay's attempts for direct contact with them. Some of our questions have been repeatedly been ignored, such as requests to explain the capital requirements it states that the FCA requires of it in its lender terms and conditions.

It has put off answering our questions about directorships, its myriad companies listed at Companies House and how they are interconnected, or whether interest is technically paid out from its trust fund. (Mostly we're asking about that last one for tax purposes – if paid from the trust then certain lender tax reliefs are applicable). It didn't answer queries into its wind-down plans or how/if they are funded.

As it stands now, statistics on SoMo's website are correct up to January 2020 SoMo is very slow to update data. Up to early 2020, it had incredibly allowed its statistics to get out-of-date by nearly two-and-a-half years.

With 2021 around the corner, SoMo finally updated its figures – but only to the beginning of 2020. It's not just the figures being consistently out-of-date, but there are some gaps that can mean bad debts are potentially hidden or rolled. As a result, the figures we present to you on the 4thWay website – you should be aware – are usually substantially out-of-date.

Some of the data that does exist gives rise to more questions than answers. To give you one example, figures as of July 2018 had 0.9% of the debt being recovered through properties being repossessed and sold. As of January 2020 (the latest information available), this figure is unchanged, and yet 19% of the loans from 2018 are still outstanding. For these loans of one year or less, this is a potential question mark as to why more of the debt has not already been recovered in court.

It's a bit weird to me, because the way SoMo picks and chooses statistics to publish is the sort of thing that happens when a P2P lending company wants to hide something, but my belief is that this is not the reason here. I believe they simply don't think enough about how it makes them look when they don't put enough effort into being open.

And, in SoMo's case, being open seems particularly important, because it's claiming double-digit annualised returns for lenders with zero losses on mostly junior lending. It needs to thoroughly back up what it's saying. It's a big black mark on what, quite probably, should be a top-rated P2P lending company.

Is SoMo profitable?

SoMo has been profitable for many years and possibly since it started, and it's financially in great shape. Being in profit is still rare at this stage in the P2P lending industry, so SoMo is ahead of the game.

What can you tell me about SoMo's cybersecurity?

The SoMo website appears to be based on out-of-date technology, making it a medium security risk according to information provided to 4thWay by Sucuri.

No malware has been detected. The website is listed as clean by Google Sage Browsing, McAfee and Yandex. The website is secure and carries a valid security certificate, helping to protect you when you supply your personal data. It has a firewall in place, which helps to block outsiders getting access to the data SoMo holds.

This assessment is not based on a full attempt to hack into the website, but rather on broader scans, which can lead to errors.

Is SoMo a good investment?

I think it's quite reasonable for wealthier lenders to lend through SoMo, but due to its opacity I think it should be limited to a small proportion of your pot of money.

What is SoMo's minimum lending amount and how many loans can I lend in?

SoMo is very exclusive, with a high minimum of £5,000 per loan, and you choose all your loans yourself. You still absolutely need to make sure you put no more than about 1% to 2% of your savings and investing pot into any one SoMo loan, and to use other lending accounts and/or savings and investing products to spread your risks.

SoMo usually offers more than enough loans over a 12-month period for you to build up a sensible portfolio of perhaps a score of loans or more. Alternatively, make a smaller portfolio and spread your money around more elsewhere.

Does SoMo have an IFISA?

SoMo does not have an IFISA.

Can I sell SoMo loans to exit early?

You can sell your loan parts to other lenders or to SoMo, if either are willing to buy, through its online secondary market. SoMo makes no charge for this.

You can list your loan parts for sale for the full amount. Alternatively, if you want, you can sell your loans for a discount. E.g. if you want to sell a £10,000 loan part, you might try to speed up the sale by offering it for £9,800.

You earn no interest while you list your loans for sale and wait for a buyer. So, at the point you list your loans for sale, you have all the risk with none of the reward. That said, SoMo says the average sale time is one-and-a-half hours and that it usually takes less than 24 hours. This is highly plausible, given SoMo's results and lender satisfaction levels.

What more do I need to know?

Unusually in this wider industry, online direct lending through SoMo is not regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority or any other authority. You're also not likely to be able to complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

SoMo's structure and lending contracts are such that, for tax purposes, you won't be able to offset any losses at SoMo with gains at other P2P lending companies, and vice versa.

Visit SoMo.

SoMo Review – extra

In this additional section:

  • A lot of unanswered questions.
  • Is SoMo truly P2P lending?
  • SoMo is not regulated for lenders and there's no recourse to the financial ombudsman.

A lot of unanswered questions

We have asked SoMo questions, sometimes more than once, and either been put off to a later a date (with the reason being that the information is “time/competitor sensitive”) or ignored.

We set our sights low in terms of the complexity of our queries and the detail we asked for, since we know from experience that P2P lending companies that provide little information without prompting are generally not willing or able to answer very detailed questions or requests for data.

I acknowledge that P2P lending companies don't exist to answer questions from 4thWay or other third parties, but we do generally expect that quality P2P platforms to happily engage with us and show off what they're capable of – particularly if they're not otherwise providing substantial, clear information to their lenders on their own websites.

Here are just some of the questions it hasn't answered:

Please tell us about City United Properties Limited

Specifically can you tell us about its connection to Social Money Limited through charges and now to you through your directorships/PSC?

United City Properties Limited

Can you explain this business with a similar name?

Somo P2P Limited

How is this platform going to be connected to, or take over from, BridgeCrowd? Why did you not just change the name of Social Money Limited?

All Somo companies

What will the full structure of Somo Bridging Limited, Somo Holdings Limited and Somo P2P Limited do?

Social Money Two Limited

What have you set up this company for?

Interest paid to platform lenders

Do you know if technically speaking – legally speaking – the interest paid out to platform investors is interest from the trust fund? Is that how it legally works or is it counted as interest from the bridging borrower or [from you]?

Capital requirements

Your investor terms mention that you stick to the FCA's capital requirements. What are the requirements for [you]?

Wind-down arrangements

Do you have any wind-down plans you can share, and how are they funded?

A very quick update on your loans

We know that providing lots of precise data is a big chore for you, so please could you just say roughly:

  • The total number of loans [you have] ever approved.
  • Roughly how many loans are outstanding.
  • Roughly how many loans are in arrears by 180 days or more.
  • Roughly how many loans you class as defaults.
  • [Have you] had any loans where some capital has been written off – how many loans was that?
  • Roughly how many of your outstanding loans have been extended or are renewals of prior loans? (With a renewal being an agreement for a new loan based on the same or nearly all the same security – the renewed loan amount can vary.)

Is SoMo truly P2P lending?

Peer-to-peer lending is not a regulated phrase. By 4thWay's definition, any online lending company is peer-to-peer if it structures itself and its loans to offer the same level of protection as direct lending, in order to protect lenders in the event that the lending company itself goes bust. Because that's the whole point of the P2P setup.

Such structures can be achieved in different ways.

The most common way is to create direct lending agreements that the regulator calls “P2P agreements”. If you're a little familiar with the technical side of this, you'll know these are article 36H agreements. Another common way to facilitate what is effectively direct lending can be through setting up bonds correctly, possibly through special companies called special purpose vehicles (SPVs), which when set up correctly can be “bankruptcy-remote” – sheltered from other connected business' bankruptcy.

It can all get quite complicated to ascertain if an online lending company is genuinely P2P, based on the legal basis of each loan contract or how the benefit of that contract is passed from one lender to another, as well as how, and if, the lenders can be properly identified for each borrower.

SoMo has gone another route in how it is legally structured. It lends money to the end borrowers itself. It then assigns not the entire loan contract itself but the beneficial part of the loan contract (meaning the repayment of the debt and the interest due) to lenders using SoMo's online platform. Technically, lenders using the platform are lending to SoMo, but SoMo's obligation to repay is limited to whatever the end borrower repays.

SoMo then uses a trust to protect lenders' cash, as well as the proceeds received from end borrowers. The property security is also held on trust for the exclusive benefit of lenders, allocated to each individual lender as per the terms of the trust.

A lawyer has confirmed to us that this structure as described should protect lenders from seeing their money being diverted to Barclays Bank – or whoever – in the event that SoMo went bust. This is provided that BridgeCrowd has set up the trusts and agreements correctly. Our legal advisor said: “Legally these protections can work and all but eliminate insolvency risk – but they must be strictly followed in practice.

SoMo is not regulated for lenders and there's no recourse to the ombudsman

SoMo is regulated for some activities, such as chasing bad debts. However, your lending is not protected by the Financial Conduct Authority, because SoMo's relationship with you is not regulated.

We also therefore can't envisage any realistic circumstances as to when lenders using SoMo's online platform might be able to submit a claim to the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS).

Why? Firstly, because you're lending to SoMo. When you lend to a company, the borrowing company isn't suddenly regulated or open to complaints to the FOS.

Secondly, because SoMo's regulatory permissions are borrower-facing, not lender facing, such as debt collection. It has the additional regulatory permission to be a regulated lender itself. However, that doesn't concern your lending to SoMo.

The fact that it doesn't have permission to hold client money is further evidence that SoMo is not handling investments in any legal or regulatory definition. When it holds your money, it's doing so because you have lent money to it; not because it's providing investment services for you.

More: visit SoMo.

You can see SoMo in our comparison tables, but remember that it has not aided us with keeping its information up-to-date for some time.

SoMo review: key details of its lending account

4thWay PLUS Rating
4thWay Unrated
Interest rate after bad debt
9%

Here we show the P2P lending site's own estimate
(or 4thWay's if theirs are not appropriate)

4thWay Risk Score
N/A

Description: £140 m since 2014 in secured short-term (bridging) & property redevelopment loans. Note this entry is very out-of-date due to lack of information from SoMo. See the Quick Expert Review, below. MIN £5,000 PER LOAN

Minimum lending amount
£5000
Exit fees - if you sell loans before borrowers fully repay
No

Early exit is not guaranteed. Usually, other lenders need to buy your loans

Do you get all your money back if you exit early?

Yes, unless you choose to sell at a discount

Loan size compared to security value
56% (average); 75% (max - including on redevelopments)
Reserve fund size as % of outstanding loans
Company/directors lend alongside you/first loss
No
SoMo Quick Expert Review: high interest rates and great reviews from lenders, but lets itself down on transparency

SoMo, formerly BridgeCrowd, does bridging loans and redevelopment loans of £500,000 or more, with a planned…

Read the full review here

Independent opinion: the opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not held by 4thWay. 4thWay is not regulated by the ESMA or the FCA, and does not provide personalised advice. The material is for general information and education purposes only and not intended to incite you to lend.

All the specialists and researchers who conduct research and write articles for 4thWay are subject to 4thWay's Editorial Code of Practice. For more, please see 4thWay's terms and conditions.

Our service is free to you. We don't receive commission from the above-mentioned companies. We receive commission from some other P2P lending companies when you click through from our website and open accounts with them. This doesn't affect our editorial independence. Read How we earn money fairly with your help.

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Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers “bonds”. Unlike its P2P lending service, its bonds don’t allow you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

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Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers two “bonds”, one of which is available as an ISA.

Unlike its P2P lending service, neither of these bonds allows you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

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Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers two “bonds”, one of which is available as an ISA.

Unlike its P2P lending service, neither of these bonds allows you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

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Why are Orchard’s interest rates different?

Orchard’s lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Orchard’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

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Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers “bonds”. Unlike its P2P lending service, its bonds don’t allow you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

Got it

×
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