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Zero Complaints About P2P Lending Companies

This morning I took a look through the Financial Ombudsman‘s complaints data to see if customers were complaining about any specific peer-to-peer lending companies. I tried over a dozen of the biggest names, including Zopa, RateSetter, Funding Circle, LendInvest, Wellesley and more. I found no decisions – either for or against any of them –… Read more

What Lenders Can Learn From Engineers

There’s a whole world of ideas out there that we can learn from in our daily lives and that includes how we do P2P lending. A great place to start is to look into the biggest ideas in psychology, accounting, maths, physics, ecology and other disciplines. Although I mention maths and physics, we really don’t have… Read more

P2P Lending Websites Partnering with Banks

I have recently been wondering whether some readers might be concerned by the increasing cosiness between banks and P2P lending companies? Since you’re not a very chatty lot – in terms of completing our article comments – I’m going to take your silence as a “Yes”. I’ll put your mind at ease straight away and… Read more

Zopa Awards are Piling Up

Looks like it’s money awards season, with the Zopa Awards cabinet needing extra timber to support the latest additions. No sooner had I written about RateSetter’s fair personal loans award than Zopa wins two other awards. Zopa has beaten all the banks in the customer services and personal loans categories for the second year running… Read more

First Great National Steams into P2P

It sounds like a train service, but it’s the latest P2P lending company to offer you the opportunity to do property loans. First Great National is a new peer-to-peer lending company focuses on developer loans with a maximum loan-to-value of between 70% and 80%. First Great national is very heavy on the marketing but low on the… Read more

Earn 5% at Lending Works Over 3 Years

Possibly the safest peer-to-peer lending company of them all, Lending Works, is increasing the interest rates from Monday 26 January. Lenders will then earn 5%. This is up from 4.3%, so it’s a big jump. It’s the interest rate you can expect after fees and bad debts. There are likely to be zero bad debts… Read more

Peer-to-Peer Lending Rebalancing Strategy

How do you rebalance your P2P loans and other investments when parts of your portfolio do better than others? For example, when your share investments perform very well and you want to split your wealth more evenly again between shares and P2P loans. Or when your high-risk P2P loans do much better or worse than… Read more

RateSetter Awards: Now Wins Ethical Lending Badge

If lending fairly, with your borrower’s interests in mind, is important to you, RateSetter has just received an award that should boost your confidence in it. RateSetter is overflowing with awards like almost no other financial company. It’s clearly doing something right. But this new award is one of the special ones. This one is real…. Read more

We Want Our Freedom…to be on Benefits!

When my colleague “tweeted” (I still think of the word “tweet” in inverted commas. How square am I?) about one peer-to-peer lender helping itself through the new pension freedoms, it really rammed home how crazy these new pension rules are. In case you don’t know From April 2015, people with pensions will simply be able to… Read more

Secured Lending Vs Provision Fund. Which is Better?

P2P lending companies use many different ways to lower the risks of lending your money. I’m going to compare two of those ways today: secured lending and bad-debt provision funds. At 4thWay, we take great pains to avoid technical language or at least to explain it clearly in our articles, guides and blogs. However, there’s a lot… Read more

Today’s average interest rates

What is the “4thWay”?

There's the savings way, the property way, the stock-market way, and now there's the peer-to-peer lending way. The 4thWay® to save and invest.
Learn more.

What does 4thWay do?

We help people save and make more money, more safely when they cut out the banks and lend directly to other people and to businesses.

Why use 4thWay?

4thWay® is shaped by investors, bank risk modellers and a senior debt specialist, and we're governed by our users to ensure our comparison services and research are trustworthy and complete.

Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers “bonds”. Unlike its P2P lending service, its bonds don’t allow you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

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Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers two “bonds”, one of which is available as an ISA.

Unlike its P2P lending service, neither of these bonds allows you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

Got it

×

Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers two “bonds”, one of which is available as an ISA.

Unlike its P2P lending service, neither of these bonds allows you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

Got it

×

Why are Orchard’s interest rates different?

Orchard’s lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Orchard’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Got it

×

Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers “bonds”. Unlike its P2P lending service, its bonds don’t allow you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

Got it

×
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