Compare P2P lending accounts and IFISAs now

Candid Opinion

Click "Learn" to get help

Secured Lending Vs Provision Fund. Which is Better?

P2P lending companies use many different ways to lower the risks of lending your money. I’m going to compare two of those ways today: secured lending and bad-debt provision funds. At 4thWay, we take great pains to avoid technical language or at least to explain it clearly in our articles, guides and blogs. However, there’s a lot… Read more

More on Why Borrower Grades Are Unreliable

More evidence that the top-grade loans at different P2P lending companies can be of very different quality. My thoughts on why you have to demand much higher interest rates from Bondora compared to Funding Circle. My colleague, Neil, recently gave an example showing that a Funding Circle C grade loan is not the same risk… Read more

Peer-to-Peer Lending is Better Than Bonds

Bonds have barely kept up with rising prices, and perhaps not even that. Peer-to-peer lending has easily given investors solid real returns. How good are bonds? On average, bonds are “a bit naff”, according to the fantastic Credit Suisse Global Investment Returns Yearbooks. OK, the Credit Suisse funded research doesn’t actually say “naff” per se, but… Read more

Savings Vs Peer-to-Peer Lending Vs Shares in 2014

I want to show you how different savings and investments did in the year just gone by. I’ve not cherry-picked this information to make peer-to-peer lending look good. I’ve looked for precisely the information that I want to know when doing a serious comparison of savings accounts vs peer-to-peer lending vs shares. All three are very useful… Read more

Same Loan Grade, Different Risk

It’s like when your say that a piece of art looks beautiful while the man at your side shakes his head in disgust. You’re both entitled to your opinions. Similarly, there are no regulations that define what an A+ loan is, or an A, or any other loan grade. Same grade, very different risk Funding Circle and rebuildingsociety… Read more

Lending Works’ Bad-Debt Provision Fund Got Better

Sorry that we missed this somehow, especially since I’m a Lending Works member: its bad-debt provision fund has got better from 1 January. The worst bit is that I was sort of told this by someone working there in December. Anyway… Here’s the situation: Lending Works now spreads your risks across all outstanding loans. This is… Read more

Start Lending Now Before P2P ISAs Arrive

When P2P ISAs arrive, probably this year, we’ll be able to lend tax-free, but a surge in lenders could see interest rates plummet. Here’s how to handle it. What good are P2P ISAs? Currently, when you lend your money through P2P lending websites in return for interest, you have to pay tax on the income… Read more

How the P2P Lending Provision Funds Compare

P2P lending provision funds set aside to reimburse lenders like you and me when loans go bad are of widely different sizes and some pay out sooner than others. How big is your provision fund? Sources: the P2P lending companies and 4thWay® As you can see in the above table, RateSetter and Lending Works* both… Read more

Your P2P Investing Strategy in 2015 and Beyond

Everyone’s always trying to beat the FTSE. I’ve seen several articles in the past few weeks touting shares that will do just that in 2015. The mere existence of the FTSE benchmarks seems to inspire competition for competition’s sake. 4thWay has its own benchmark of P2P lending returns for individual investors too: the 4thWay P2P Forecast Returns Index. You… Read more

2015: Great Returns on Peer-to-Peer Lending

Now is a very attractive time for peer-to-peer lending with interest rates well above where they should be for the risks involved. Why is 2015 such a good year? While borrowers are being quick to get on board for the lower rates and better terms, lenders, on the other hand, are being slower to accept… Read more

Today’s average interest rates

What is the “4thWay”?

There's the savings way, the property way, the stock-market way, and now there's the peer-to-peer lending way. The 4thWay® to save and invest.
Learn more.

What does 4thWay do?

We help people save and make more money, more safely when they cut out the banks and lend directly to other people and to businesses.

Why use 4thWay?

4thWay® is shaped by investors, bank risk modellers and a senior debt specialist, and we're governed by our users to ensure our comparison services and research are trustworthy and complete.

Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers “bonds”. Unlike its P2P lending service, its bonds don’t allow you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

Got it

×

Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers two “bonds”, one of which is available as an ISA.

Unlike its P2P lending service, neither of these bonds allows you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

Got it

×

Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers two “bonds”, one of which is available as an ISA.

Unlike its P2P lending service, neither of these bonds allows you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

Got it

×

Why are Orchard’s interest rates different?

Orchard’s lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Orchard’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Got it

×

Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers “bonds”. Unlike its P2P lending service, its bonds don’t allow you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

Got it

×
Back to top