Landbay Suffers First Tardy Borrowers, Changes Lending Standards

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By on 30 November, 2018 | Read more by this author

https://www.4thway.co.uk/?p=14133

Landbay*, which does mortgages for residential landlords, has had a perfect record since it started in 2014, with no peer-to-peer loans falling even one payment late.

As of this month, it now has three loans out of 733 – or 0.4% – that have each missed a payment and have therefore fallen just slightly late.

At this stage, this minor blip doesn't touch Landbay's +++ Rating, the top rating. It also still retains its Risk Score of 2/10, the lowest of all P2P lending sites. At this point in Landbay's life and in the current economy, its late loans are within expectations. (Read About The 4thWay PLUS Ratings and 4thWay Risk Scores.)

It was inevitable that Landbay, like all P2P lending sites, would eventually suffer some late loans. It will also suffer bad debts at some point too. No type of lending is immune to bad debts, even when it comes to safer forms of lending such as this.

In other news…

This was all announced quite a lot of weeks ago, but I've been waiting to find an article I can slot it into.

We were a bit saddened when Landbay increased its maximum loan a few years ago, allowing landlords to borrow up to 80% of their property's valuation. 80% is fine for a maximum for these kinds of loans. But obviously for lenders the previous maximum of 70% was better, since it offers more protection to lenders in the event the borrower can't repay and their property needs to be sold on your behalf.

So we are pleased to see that the maximum has now been reduced to 75%.

The average loan size (in contrast to the maximum loan size) has risen over the past few years from below 70% to be around 75%, which really is about as high as we would ever like to see it – any higher and it could impact Landbay's 4thWay PLUS Rating or Risk Score, increasing the odds of losses in a severe recession. So with the lower maximum we expect this average loan site to improve.

Landbay has also increased the maximum loan amount to £1.5 million, up from about £1 million previously. I don't think this will usually mean that you will lend more to the same borrower, which would have been a potential concern.

4thWay's experts also don't currently expect that these slightly larger loans are more likely to go bad or result in losses, although that is something that they will keep an eye on for you.

As a result of the change, the loans that Landbay will make available for both individual lenders and institutional lenders (e.g. banks and investments funds) will now be the same, which helps us to see that things are fair, and that institutions are not being favoured over the little guy or gal.

Read About The 4thWay PLUS Ratings and 4thWay Risk Scores.

5 Reasons Why Lending to Residential Landlords Is The Lowest Risk.

Read 4thWay's Quick Expert Landbay Review.

Visit Landbay*.

The opinions expressed are those of the author and not held by 4thWay. 4thWay is not regulated by the ESMA or the FCA, and does not provide personalised advice. The material is for general information and education purposes only and not intended to incite you to lend.

Experts, journalists and bloggers who conduct research and write articles for 4thWay are subject to 4thWay's Editorial Code of Practice. For more, please see 4thWay's terms and conditions.

The 4thWay® PLUS Ratings are calculations that were developed by professional risk modellers (someone who models risks for the banks), experienced investors and a debt specialist from one of the major consultancy firms. They measure the risks and rewards of losing money in scenarios up to a serious recession and a major property crash, and they assume you spread your money across lots of loans and rated P2P lending accounts or IFISAs. The rating is calculated using objective criteria that can be measured and improved on over time, although no rating system is perfect. Read more about the 4thWay® PLUS Ratings.

*Commission and impartial research: our service is free to you. We already show dozens of P2P lending companies in our accurate comparison tables and we keep adding more as soon as they provide us with enough details. We receive compensation from Landbay and other P2P lending companies not mentioned above when you click through from our website and open accounts with them. We vigorously ensure that this doesn't affect our editorial independence. Read How we earn money fairly with your help.

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Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers “bonds”. Unlike its P2P lending service, its bonds don’t allow you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

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Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers two “bonds”, one of which is available as an ISA.

Unlike its P2P lending service, neither of these bonds allows you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

Got it

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Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers two “bonds”, one of which is available as an ISA.

Unlike its P2P lending service, neither of these bonds allows you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

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Orchard’s lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Orchard’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

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Why are Wellesley’s interest rates different?

Wellesley’s P2P lending rates appear higher on its own website than on 4thWay®.

This is because we calculate Wellesley’s interest rates the same way most other P2P lending websites do. We do this so that you can compare the rates more easily and so that they show a more accurate picture of what you’ll earn.

Important information before you visit Wellesley & Co.

Wellesley & Co. is primarily a P2P lending website.

But, when you visit the Wellesley website, you’ll see that it also offers “bonds”. Unlike its P2P lending service, its bonds don’t allow you to lend directly to 100+ borrowers.

Instead, you lend to Wellesley and it lends to other borrowers.

We have not risk-rated either of those bonds, but we expect that their structure makes them more risky, particularly because you’re lending to just one borrower.

Got it

×
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